The Body Counter

March 15th, 2012

The Body Counter, or, What Statistical Analysis Can Teach Us about Atrocities…

Traditionally, human rights work has been more akin to investigative reporting, but [Patrick] Ball is the most influential of a handful of people around the world who see that world not in terms of words, but of figures. His specialty is applying quantitative analysis to mountains of anecdotes, finding the correlations that coax out a story that cannot easily be dismissed.

[...]

In testifying [during the trial of Slobodan Milosevic], Ball was doing something other human rights workers can only fantasize about: He confronted the accused, presented him with evidence, and watched him being held to account. At that point, Milosevic in his four wars had killed some 125,000 people, more than anyone in Europe since Stalin. But now the Butcher of the Balkans sat in a courtroom that looked rather like a community college classroom, with two Dutch police officers behind him and his cell waiting for him at the end of each day's session, rhetorical bluster his only available weapon against Ball's evidence.

Milosevic died before the trial ended. Ball returned to Washington and then went on to Lima to work for Peru's Truth and Reconciliation Commission — one of dozens of truth commissions, tribunals, and investigatory bodies where his methods have changed our understanding of war. [...]

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