Shadowless

April 5th, 2015

Casting no shadow:

Ingenious London architects have designed a new skyscraper for a site in Greenwich that doesn't cast a single shadow.

But this isn't witchcraft, just really damn clever design. To minimise the effect of the vertical build on nearby communities, the appropriately dubbed 'No Shadow' buildings are designed so that when one building creates shade, the other acts as a gigantic mirror, reflecting the light downwards into its shadow

[Via @cityofsound]

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The Steel House

February 9th, 2015

Robert Bruno's Steel House is a sculpture more than it's a home:

Robert Bruno labored for decades to build one of America's most striking houses, but died before he could complete it. Is there a way to preserve his work and legacy?

How on earth haven't I seen this before? Surely it should have shown up in some science fiction film or TV series as the alien base or the hero's desert refuge or a parked spaceship?

[Via MetaFilter]

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Curtain Door

February 4th, 2015

Design Milk on the Curtain Door by Matharoo Associates:

[The Curtain Door…] is most definitely a door like no other I've seen. The massive door is made of 40 sections of thick Burma teak and sits between the entrance's concrete walls. Each section has been carved to incorporate 160 pulleys, 80 ball bearings, one wire rope, and a hidden counterweight.

Matharoo Associates Curtain Door

File under "Gorgeous, but possibly a tad high-maintenance".

[Via jwz]

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Yolo Buggies

May 31st, 2014

Geoff Manaugh, on the work of 19th century surveyors in California who set out to map out the borders between counties:

Like a dust-covered Tron of the desert, surrounded by the invisible mathematics of a grid that had yet to be realized, these over-dressed gentlemen of another century helped give rise to an abstract model of the state.

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Like some kind of gallstone

May 5th, 2014

19 feet down and 9 feet to the west of the original site:

Like the Pentagon, its better-known counterpart in the United States, Britain's Ministry of Defence building is a fairly mundane, if gigantic, office block camouflaging a much more exciting subterranean realm of secret tunnels, bunkers, and – at least in the MoD's case – a perfectly preserved Tudor wine cellar. […]

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Čumil

March 9th, 2014

Meet Čumil the Peeper:

His name is Čumil and he is either resting after cleaning the sewer or is looking under women's skirts. […]

Čumil

[Prompted by the header image of this New Statesman article about Slovakia]

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The TARDIS of furniture

February 24th, 2014

Roentgen Objects are genuinely remarkable pieces of furniture:

The furniture is a process – an event – a seemingly endless sequence of new spatial conditions and states expanding outward into the room around it.

Each piece is a controlled explosion of carpentry with no real purpose other than to test the limits of volumetric self-demonstration, offering little in the way of useful storage space and simply showing off, performing, a spatial Olympics of shelves within shelves and spaces hiding spaces.

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Shards B&W

March 12th, 2013

John Naughton's Shards B&W:

Shards B&W

Best viewed as big as possible.

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Test Room

January 6th, 2013

BLDGBLOG relates the story of a 'Test Room' in Eugene, Oregon:

In August 1965 […] "ads in the local newspaper… promised complimentary checkups at the new Oregon Research Institute Vision Research Center." But these promised eye exams were not all that they seemed.

The office was, in fact, a model – a disguised simulation – including a "stereotypical waiting room" where respondents to the ad would be "greeted by a receptionist" who could escort them into a fake "examination room" that turned out to be examining something else entirely.

I guarantee that you won't guess what they were testing for.

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Balconies

November 24th, 2012

Daniel Kalder has a very particular idea about his perfect dwelling place: it absolutely must have a balcony

On a recent visit to Istanbul I stayed in an apartment looking out on the Bosphorus. Every morning I'd get up and see the sun sparkling on the surface of the water as birds circled languidly overhead. At night it was even better, as the thumping techno from the pleasure boats and the call of the Muezzin intermingled. It was very different from my usual mode of accommodation when I travel: cheap hotels, dirt, and the lingering possibility of sudden, violent death.

In many ways it was the culmination of a quest that began years ago in my hometown of Dunfermline in Scotland. Over there, you don't see too many balconies. It's too windy and wet. Yet I remember one house that had a huge balcony on the second floor. I used to walk past, wishing I lived there. I didn't care that it was useless, that if I sat up there the wind would probably pick me up and drop me in the North Sea. I only saw the ideal of open living, close to the sky. […]

[Via The Browser]

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