Icelandic lava tubes

June 23rd, 2013

Photographs of Icelandic lava tubes, looking like the setting for a particularly gloopy science fiction/horror film.

Raufarholshellir lava tube cave

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Elliðaey

October 17th, 2010

Provided that this house,1 on the island of Elliðaey off the coast of Iceland had a decently fast internet connection, decent central heating, and a big enough basement to store nine months-worth of food and fuel, it'd be pretty much my ideal home.

[Via FFFFOUND!]

  1. For the record, despite all the articles claiming otherwise, apparently neither the house nor the island belongs to Björk. It's still a magnificent location, though.

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Images of Eyafallajökull

April 19th, 2010

Impressive as today's Astronomy Picture of the Day is, this gallery of images of the Eyafallajökull volcano is even better. Look at this, or this, or this.

[Via missingvolume, posting to this comment thread]

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A wake in Reykjavik

November 6th, 2009

CNN reports on a wake in Reykjavik:

REYKJAVIK, Iceland – All reporters will tell you from time to time that they do their work out of love of the story, a need to tell the world. This, I'm sorry to say, is not one of those times.

There are some CNN assignments which are performed not from either of those noble motivations but simply from duty, or happening to be in the right place at the right time, which really means you are in the wrong place at the wrong time.

[…]

I cannot bear even to mention the name of my subject, but I don't need to. The first few targets of my intended interview rush past, evading the red and white CNN mike box. Apparently nerves remain raw and emotions are running high.

In less than 48 hours from my filing of this report, Iceland, a country of a mere 300 thousand souls – is destined to become a more soulless place as its three branches of the mighty McDonald's forest are lopped off by the tree surgeon of global finance. […]

[Via The Scout Report]

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Iceland = Iapetus?

August 1st, 2009

Planetary scientist Jani Radebaugh recently went to Iceland in the hope of picking up some pointers about why Iapetus looks so distinctive:

There has long been discussion about the dramatic difference between the light and dark terrains on Saturn's moon Iapetus. This body's leading hemisphere is thought to be coated in an unusually dark dust, and its trailing hemisphere has unusually bright material, probably fairly fresh ice or even "snow". The question for these terrains on Iapetus is usually, is it dark on light, or light on dark? If dark on light, this would imply the dust blanketed the surface later than the ice, perhaps acquired from dusty regions in its orbit. If light on dark, then Iapetus' dark surface has been coated by ice in some process that has released this volatile from elsewhere on Iapetus more recently than the emplacement of the dark coating.

What I saw on Grimsvotn made me realize the situation may be more complicated. […]

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