Eternal Sunshine of the 8 Bit Mind

August 24th, 2015

8 Bit Cinema's magnificent take on Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind reminded me that it's been far too long since I last saw the original.

Also, I love me a bit of ELO on the soundtrack, even when it's in 8-bit form. What's it going to take to get Jeff Lynne the knighthood he so richly deserves? Surely he's done enough fine work post-ELO as a producer and a Wilbury to outweigh the stigma of Xanadu?1

[Via rogerebert.com]

  1. Joking aside, you've got to wonder whether he's just one of those public figures who quietly turned a gong down years ago.

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Workin' In A Cocktail Bar

August 4th, 2015

What sort of sick, twisted mind does it take to come up with the idea of doing this to one of the great New Romantic singles?

I'll tell you what sort: the mind of a bloody genius!

[Via The A.V. Club, via web-goddess.org]

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I really should watch 'Strange Days' again

February 15th, 2015

Strange Days (1995) – Trivia:

In a scene between Mace (Angela Bassett) and Lenny (Ralph Fiennes), Mace says "…Right Here Right Now." This is exactly where Norman 'Fatboy Slim' Cook obtained the sample from that is heard in his single "Right Here Right Now".

(Sorry, I can't remember where I saw this mentioned a couple of weeks ago.)

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Shake It Off (The Perfect Drug)

February 5th, 2015

So, apparently Taylor Swift is the Perfect Drug:

[Via kottke.org]

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Genius at work

August 12th, 2014

Anil Dash digs deep into the evolution of Purple Rain and It Is Glorious:

While Prince and the Revolution had been carefully rehearsing Purple Rain all summer, adjusting each detail of how the song was structured and played, Prince's nearly-unequalled ability to spontaneously take a live performance to the next level was certainly on display that August night.

Exemplifying this ability is the repeated lilting motif that Prince begins playing on his guitar at 4:40 in the song. For all the countless times they'd practiced the song, even earlier on the same day as the First Avenue performance, Prince had never played this riff during Purple Rain before. In the original live show, it's clear that Prince realizes he's found something magical, returning again and again to this brief riff, not just on guitar but even singing it himself during the final fade of the song.

Just as striking is how this little riff shows the care and self-criticism that went into making the song Purple Rain. Like any brilliant 25-year-old guy who's thought of something clever, Prince's tendency when he thought of this little gem was to overdo it. In the unedited version of the song, Prince keeps playing the riff for almost another minute, pacing around the stage trying to will the audience into responding to it.

But during those same sessions where the strings were added to the song, Prince ruthlessly chopped down a riff he clearly loves, keeping just enough to serve as a stirring melodic hook for his guitar solo, and leading the song to its soaring vocal climax.

To this day I still think that When Doves Cry is the best track from Purple Rain, but I've got to bow to the majority view on this one: come the sad day when Prince Rogers Nelson passes on it's the title track that's going to be played to remind us of the talent we'll have lost.

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Rejoice!

May 5th, 2014

There's a new episode of the Word Podcast:

Includes: world debut of enthralling new parlour game Rock Poker; Neil Finn's Two-Way Family Favourites; the two tribes of Adam Ant Nation; Justin Timberlake's moveable feast; why long-form TV is a sinister plot to steal our lives; a pathetic attempt to read a whole paragraph of Mark Ellen's book "Rock Stars Stole My Life" without laughing; plus uncalled for interjections from Fraser Lewry's amazing wi-fi rabbit and your questions answered.

[Via David Hepworth's Notebook]

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Best of Björk

April 6th, 2014

Perusing a recent Guardian article listing 10 of the best tracks by Björk, I came across a mention in comments of her performing a David Arnold arrangement of You Only Live Twice. I'd never heard this before (for some reason it didn't show up on David Arnold's Shaken and Stirred album of Bond theme cover versions) and it's fantastic:

That said, I'm not sure that this would make it into my personal Top 10 Björk tracks; not a slight on this performance, more a consequence of Björk having spent twenty-odd years making distinctive and frequently surprising music so that there's a lot of competition for the honour.

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Moses Supposes…

April 4th, 2014

義足のMoses is pretty much the cutest thing I've seen all week:

[Via MetaFilter]

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Word Podcast 218

March 11th, 2014

Listeners of a certain vintage will be pleased to hear that Mark Ellen, David Hepworth and Fraser Lewry reconvened the other day to record one more edition of the Word Podcast:

Word Podcast 218 – Where's The Crisps? – March 2014: Mark Ellen, David Hepworth and Fraser Lewry convene over cakes to discuss: why all rock docs are legally bound to feature Bono, the touching story of Harry Nilsson's last marriage, what Jimi Hendrix really got up to in Marrakesh, whether Ginger Baker is in fact a bit of a bore, Fraser's day trip to North Korea and the book what Mark wrote. And Vikings.

Be nice to think they might find a way to do more of these, but either way I'm going to enjoy listening to this tomorrow.

[Via David Hepworth's Notebook]

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THUNDEROUS, SUSTAINED APPLAUSE

February 28th, 2014

Maciej Ceglowski's Webstock presentation on Our Comrade The Electron draws lessons for modern technologists from the life of Lev Sergeyevich Termen, the inventor of – among other things – the theremin:

Termen was just what Lenin needed: a Soviet inventor with an electrical gizmo that would dazzle and amaze the masses, and help sell the suspicious countryside on electrification. He gave Termen a permanent rail pass, encouraging him to take his show on the road all over the Soviet Union.

When Lenin died a few years later, Termen sent urgent word that Lenin's body be immediately frozen. He had an idea for how to bring him back to life, but it required putting the body on ice. He was devastated to learn that Lenin's brain had already been taken out and pickled in alcohol, and his body embalmed for public viewing.

Given Termen's track record of technical achievement, it's probably a good thing he didn't get a chance at making zombie Lenin.

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