Dallas Storm Timelapse

March 30th, 2014

Dallas Storm Timelapse:

(For a view from above of a similar phenomenon, see this NASA Earth Observatory feature on images of lightning storms taken from the ISS. Only still images, but impressively big ones.)

[Via The Awl]

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Stormscapes

February 13th, 2014

More weather, this time a collection of Stormscapes:

At several points during that video I was fully expecting the clouds to part as a Spielbergesque spaceship descended.1

[Via kottke.org]

  1. You know the sort of thing: big, shaped and lit like a particularly sparkly Xmas tree decoration, gliding slowly and almost silently towards a group of awestruck humans who've suddenly come to understand just how small and primitive and young the human race is.

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Now? Right here?

February 13th, 2014

Michael Shainblum's image of the Burj Khalifa being struck by lightning doesn't deserve to be embedded here in scaled-down form: follow that link and see it properly. It's worth it.

(I do hope there was a mad scientist at the top of the tower, cackling maniacally as he tried to tap the power of the lightning storm to breathe life into his creation. Seems like such a waste of a good lightning bolt, otherwise…)

[Via Bad Astronomy]

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Pluto weather forecast

May 4th, 2013

It looks as if when NASA's New Horizons probe arrives at Pluto in 2015 it's going to find weather that is both relatively simple and yet quite difficult to predict:

To establish context: Pluto, like Earth and Titan, has a nitrogen-rich atmosphere. It's a very thin atmosphere, its pressure measured in microbars. Earth's atmospheric pressure is, of course, about one bar. Titan's is 1.6 bars. Mars' is a hundred times more tenuous, less than 10 millibars. Pluto's is about a hundred times more tenuous again, less than 100 microbars. Which is really thin; but it's way thicker than the essentially airless exospheres at Mercury and the Moon. Pluto has plenty enough atmosphere for the world to have wind and weather and clouds, just like Venus and Earth and Mars and Titan.

Nitrogen in Pluto's air is in equilibrium with nitrogen frost or ice on the ground. Broadly speaking, when Pluto warms up, ice sublimates to gas, and the atmospheric pressure goes up. When Pluto cools, you get frost and a lower atmospheric pressure. Changing seasons remove ice from the summer pole, and may re-deposit it at the winter pole.

Emily Lakdawalla's post goes into much more detail about why it's so hard to predict what New Horizons will find, even taking into account what we know from probes to destinations elsewhere in the solar system. Which, as she notes, is exactly why it's necessary to send a spaceship out to Pluto – to tell us which theories are right and which are wrong (and in turn to fuel a couple of decades-worth of scientific papers figuring out whether the theories that gave the right answers did so for the right reasons.)

In the meantime, New Horizons will be heading on out to the Kuiper Belt, which promises to be interesting in an entirely different way.

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Welsh words for rain

February 11th, 2013

From Joe Moran: Welsh words for rain. Something of an epic, including…

bwrw – to rain
glawio – raining
dafnu – spotting
[...]
brasfrwrw – big spaced drops
sgrympian – short sharp shower
[...]
Mae hi'n brwr hen wragedd a ffyn – It's raining old women and sticks

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Heat upgrades

January 8th, 2013

Australia is experiencing such a heatwave that meteorologists are having to come up with new colours for their weather maps:

SYDNEY – Extreme heat in Australia forced the government's weather bureau to upgrade its temperature scale, with new colours on the climate map to reflect new highs forecast next week.

Central Australia was shown with a purple area on the latest Bureau of Meteorology forecast map issued for next Monday, a new colour code suggesting temperatures will soar above 50 degrees Celsius (122 Fahrenheit).

The bureau's head of climate monitoring and prediction David Jones said the new scale, which also features a pink code for temperatures from 52 to 54 degrees, reflected the potential for old heat records to be smashed.

(Meanwhile in the UK, the Met Office is most likely devising symbols to represent how deep the flooding gets, in the event that your local river decides to burst through your flood defences and saunter up to – and under – your front door. With bonus points if they can design a symbol that simultaneously indicates both how deep the flooding is and how many years in a row flooding has affected that particular town or village.)

[Via kottke.org]

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Hurricane Sandy: After Landfall

October 31st, 2012

Hurricane Sandy: After Landfall.

I found #48 particularly striking – surreal, even.

[Via The Browser]

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Three images

July 7th, 2012

Not one, not two, but three striking images:

[Lightning Storm Formation video via Bad Astronomy]

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Polar Mesospheric Clouds

June 25th, 2012

Polar Mesospheric Clouds, Northern Hemisphere. Or, Blue Skies At Night.

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A Martian monster

April 11th, 2012

A Martian dust devil. That's a 20 kilometre high Martian dust devil.

If Andrew Stanton & co ever get to make a sequel to John Carter I trust they'll have one of these make a cameo appearance.

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#19

October 18th, 2011

When lightning strikes …

Be sure to take a look at picture #19: that's not something you see every day.

[Via Gary Farber]

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Tornado Track

June 7th, 2011

Tornado Track near Sturbridge, Massachusetts. Wow.

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A small consolation

January 31st, 2011

To file under "Positive effects of global climate change": a NASA scientist reports that noctilucent clouds are getting both brighter and more commonplace.

After the Sun sets on a summer evening and the sky fades to black, you may be lucky enough to see thin, wavy clouds illuminating the night, such as these seen over Billund, Denmark, on July 15, 2010. Noctilucent or polar mesospheric clouds, form at very high altitudes – between 80 and 85 kilometers (50–53 miles) – which positions them to reflect light long after the Sun has dropped below the horizon. These "night-shining" clouds are rare – rare enough that Matthew DeLand, who has been studying them for 11 years, has only seen them once in person. But the chances of seeing these elusive clouds are increasing.

DeLand, an atmospheric scientist with Science Systems and Applications Inc. and NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, has found that polar mesospheric clouds are forming more frequently and becoming brighter. [...]

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Einstein was a cat person

January 25th, 2011

Ten Obscure Factoids Concerning Albert Einstein:

10. His Cat Suffered Depression

Fond of animals, Einstein kept a housecat which tended to get depressed whenever it rained. Ernst Straus recalls him saying to the melancholy cat: "I know what's wrong, dear fellow, but I don't know how to turn it off."

[Via Interconnected]

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Brisbane before and after

January 18th, 2011

Brisbane floods: before and after.

Nice user interface for the gallery: horrifying images.

[Via Bifurcated Rivets]

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Flood

January 15th, 2011

Dan Hill has posted an epic tale of life in Brisbane as the floodwater started to rise:

We spot a large advert for chocolate milk adorning a building. "Dive into chocolately fun" it says. It seems newly relevant as we see the river, looking exactly like a vast, smooth soup of milk chocolate. The Brisbane River is famously brown at the best of times, being an extremely silty bit of river, but is now browner than ever.

The landscape round here is distinctly suburban. Not quite the manicured suburban of rich Los Angeles suburbs, or even 'Erinsborough', but the slightly more raggedy Australian version, with cars parked on lawns, rampant foliage growing in and around the low, angled roofs, set against straggly gum trees and paperbarks, a most unruly genus. But it's distinctly suburban nonetheless, which adds to the surreal aspect of views like Witton Road, where that chocolately fun engulfs a training shoe, some wheelie bins, and a box of breakfast cereal, and most of the street.

The most striking observation, for me, came as he recounted a trip to stock up on sandbags:

We've run out of sandbags [...] so we have to drive out to Kedron to pick up as many as we can load in the boot of the car. Plotting routes in and around the city is relatively complex, as you're listening for road closures on the radio, looking for the blue wriggle of creeks and rivers on the map, and trying to remember the topography of the city, all those swoops of valleys.

When was the last time you had to stop and think about whether your route took you uphill or downhill as you drove around a city?

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Snow indoors

December 14th, 2010

I know this footage of the roof of the Hubert H Humphrey Metrodome collapsing in the face of a couple of feet of snow and a blizzard has been all over the web over the last 24 hours, but that's because it's disaster-movie spectacular. It's quite hypnotic: I defy anyone to watch it just once.

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Uluru in the rain

October 26th, 2010

Rain falls on Uluru.

The phrase "awe-inspiring" might have been invented for just this purpose.

[Via MetaFilter]

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German (weather) engineering

March 13th, 2010

Apparently, the Mercedes-Benz Museum in Stuttgart has a ventilation system capable of creating an artificial tornado inside the building.

What could possibly go wrong?

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Pretty cold

January 10th, 2010

The photograph of a snow-covered Britain that made the front pages of the UK press a few days ago is available at 250m per pixel resolution here. At that size1 it's much more impressive than it was on paper.

[Via Bad Astronomy]

  1. 3400 x 4400 pixels, for a total file size of 3MB.

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