danah boyd's reflections on how the technology business talked about what it could do for the world at this year's World Economic Forum at Davos are well worth a look:

Conversations around tech were strangely juxtaposed with the broader social and fiscal concerns that rattled through the halls. Faced with a humanitarian crises and widespread anxieties about inequality, much of civil society responded to tech enthusiasm by asking if technology will destabilize labor and economic well-being. A fair question. The only problem is that no one knows, and the models of potential impact are so variable as to be useless. Not surprisingly, these conversations then devolved into sharply split battles, as people lost track of whether all jobs would be automated or whether automation would trigger a lot more jobs.

Not only did any nuance get lost in this conversation, but so did the messy reality of doing tech. It's hard to explain to political actors why, just because tech can (poorly) target advertising, this doesn't mean that it can find someone who is trying to recruit for ISIS. Just because advances in AI-driven computer vision are enabling new image detection capabilities, this doesn't mean that precision medicine is around the corner. And no one seemed to realize that artificial intelligence in this context is just another word for "big data." Ah, the hype cycle.

[Via Memex 1.1]